ARTICLE EXPLORES ASEPTIC TECHNIQUE THAT PREVENTS INFECTION.

As pharmacists and technicians, we are an integral part of the delivery of health care to patients in a variety of practice settings. One of the most important changes that we can actively contribute to is the “Targeting Zero” initiative, created by the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) to prevent the most common and fatal healthcare-associated infections (HAIs).

Verifying an Employee’s Aseptic Technique

Media-fill testing involving the manipulation of a suitable growth media (tryptic soy broth) represents one of the most objective methods of evaluating an employee’s knowledge and skill in asepsis. A media-fill or process-simulation test mimics an actual and entire compounding procedure, using a suitable growth medium, such as tryptic soy broth (TSB), in place of the typical ingredients to prepare a finished compounded preparation. According to USP Chapter <797>, media-fill testing also represents the most challenging or stressful conditions actually encountered by the personnel being evaluated when they prepare a compounded sterile preparation. In addition to verifying an individual’s ability, process-simulation testing can also be used to evaluate and identify the capabilities and weakness of aseptic compounding procedures that could contribute to the inaccuracy and/or contamination of the compounded sterile preparation. Using the Parenteral Drug Association’s Technical Report No. 22 (published in 1996) as a basis, a properly designed process-simulation test will be able to:

A Practical to Aseptic Technique Verification: Policies and Procedures that Meet USP Chapter <797> Requirements.

ENSURING THAT PERSONNEL MAINTAIN GOOD ASEPTIC TECHNIQUE DURING all phases of the compounding process is critical to the sterility of the final CSPs (compounded sterile preparations). Good aseptic technique requires that personnel be properly trained through a didactic review of the principles of contamination control, and that they successfully demonstrate knowledge and skill through written and aseptic technique verification tests. Training will create a sense of importance, vigilance, and employee responsibility that helps to establish a culture of quality.

EVALUATION OF ASEPTIC TECHNIQUES AND CHLORHEXIDINE ON THE RATE OF CATHETER-ASSOCIATED URINARY-TRACT INFECTION

Aseptic techniques used together with chlorhexidine reduced the infection rate and prevented cross-infection in patients undergoing urinary-tract catheterisation. Infection of the bladder appears to have arisen by contamination of the catheter-meatal junction, at which site antiseptic prophylaxis in the presence of bathing was ineffective. Patients having short-term catheterisation should not be placed in baths, since wetting the perineum will contaminate the urethral meatus with mixed enterobacteria, predisposing the female patient in particular to infection.

5 Top Reasons Why Aseptic Techniques Training is Important .

Hospital employees who are in constant contact with ill patients need to be trained about aseptic techniques. These employees are nurses, doctors, and others who provide continual care to patients. Aseptic techniques are a set of procedures that are followed by doctors and nurses in a healthcare setting in order to prevent spreading of infection. Although not all healthcare employees deal closely with patients, it is always good for all the employees to know these aseptic techniques.

Control of the aseptic processing environment.

Methods used by industry with applications to hospital pharmacy for maintaining an aseptic environment in production of sterile pharmaceutical products are discussed. A major source of product contamination is airborne microorganisms. The laminar-airflow workbench with a high-efficiency particulate air filter provides an ultraclean environment for preparation of sterile products. However, the workbench does not guarantee sterility of products and is not effective if not properly installed and maintained or if the operator uses poor aseptic technique. The laminar-airflow workbench should be tested for leaks, airflow velocity, and airflow patterns when installed, and the workbench should be checked periodically thereafter. The workbench should be placed in a cleanroom where traffic and air disturbances that might affect the laminar airflow are eliminated. A major source of airborne microbial contamination in cleanrooms is people. Personnel movement through an area and presence of personnel without lint-free, nonshedding protective garments increase the levels of microbial contaminants in an area. The transport of nonsterile products (bottles, boxes, paper products) into a cleanroom should be minimized. The cleanroom itself should be sanitized and should be immaculate.

Methods Manual – Applied Microbiology

Bacteria live in our soil, streams, food, in us, and in virtually all habitable (and some seemingly inhabitable) locations on earth. They can make us wine, yogurt, and garden compost, and without them we couldn’t even digest our food. All nitrogen would eventually be lost to the atmosphere without them. Bacteria are increasingly used as research tools and in biotechnology, supplying us with recombinant DNA, enzymes, and designer drugs. We are even increasingly using them to rid ourselves of toxic wastes

Sterile Compounding: A Guide for Community Pharmacists

After reading this article you will:

  • understand the principles of sterile compounding
  • understand the requirements for sterile compounding
  • understand the principles of operation of a laminar air flow hood

Aseptic Technique Prevents Infection

As pharmacists and technicians, we are an integral part of the delivery of health care to patients in a variety of practice settings. One of the most important changes that we can actively contribute to is the “Targeting Zero” initiative, created by the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) to prevent the most common and fatal healthcare-associated infections (HAIs).1